Women Are Demanding More From Their Money

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As women continue to embrace the role of CFO of their households, it should come as no surprise that they are demanding more from their money. According to the f=Fidelity Investments’ women and investing study, nearly three quarters of women across all ages plan to take steps within the next six months to help make their money work harder and grow.

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Lorna Kapusta, vice president of women and investing at Fidelity Investments joined us to talk more about that study.

Fidelity Investments’ Women and Investing Study finds that nearly three quarters – 72% – of women across all ages plan to take steps within the next six months to help make their money work harder and grow. With Women’s History Month in March and Equal Pay Day in early April, Fidelity wants to arm women with the tools they need to make this happen.

Today, more than half of women – 56% – are still not investing their savings, and instead leaving nearly all in cash or bank accounts – which on average currently earn less than a one percent return – which means many may be missing out on thousands of dollars in potential earnings.

The good news is that more women are recognizing that it’s time to demand more. Of note, millennial women are leaning in most, with nearly half – 48% – already investing, followed by approximately 40 percent of their Gen X and baby boomer counterparts.

For more information, visit Fidelity.com/DemandMore.

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