Journalist Spent His Career Fighting Discrimination, Sharing Urban Perspective

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In honor of Black History Month, Eye Opener recognizes legendary columnist Acel Moore, whose work reporting on the conditions at the Fairview State Hospital for the mentally ill earned him, and his colleague Wendell Rawls, Jr., the Pulitzer Prize for Local Investigative Specialized Reporting in 1977. Moore also made waves with his “Urban Perspectives” column for the Inquirer, in which he provided an honest perspective on his life and the lives of those working to improve their neighborhoods within the Philadelphia community.

Acel Moore began his career in the sixties, during which time he made it his mission to write stories about people who didn’t have a voice in the media.

“If you read newspapers every day in different parts of the country you would say African-Americans never died because you never saw them in obituaries,” Moore said. “Except in crime and some sports once in a while and of course entertainment but other than that they didn’t exist.”

Take a look to learn more about this seasoned journalist who continues to inspire young African-Americans to dream big and make their voices heard.

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