Memorial Service Held For Southwest Airlines Flight Victim

Many Southwest passengers are dealing with cancellations and delays as the airlines conducts engine inspections.

It comes after an engine blew apart above our area on one of their flights last week killing a passenger.

On Sunday, a memorial service was held for the victim. 43 year-old Jennifer Riordan. Debris from the engine struck a window next to her seat. Riordan was partially sucked out of the broken window, but other passengers were able to pull her back inside.

The plane was able to land at Philadelphia international airport.

A coroner said she died from blunt force trauma to the head, neck and torso.

Riordan was a Wells Fargo bank executive, wife, and a mother of two.

Southwest said she is the first person in the company's history to die from an in-flight incident.

The National Transportation Safety Board says that people around our community are still finding debris from the engine of that plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration recently ordered airlines to perform ultrasound inspections of engines like the one on flight 1380.

Officials said that the naked eye cannot detect signs of metal fatigue that doomed flight 1380.

Southwest said they have accelerated their fan blade inspection process on similar engines as well.

In fact, the company said they had to cancel around 40 flights on Sunday, which is only about one percent of their scheduled flights.

The company said they have been performing inspections overnight and using spare aircraft to help minimize disruptions.

The company that manufactured that engine recently recommended that airlines inspect that type of engine more frequently.